Department of Philosophy/A.Y. 2020-21
PH-313 FEMINIST PHILOSOPHY-I
MUZAFFAR ALI MALLA

PH-313 FEMINIST PHILOSOPHY-I

The tradition of Philosophy is generally  considered as misogynistic and male-centeric. Feminist Scholars such as Luce Irigaray,  Sally Haslanger, Meena Kelkar, Kanchana Natarajan (among others) have widely debated the misogynistic and male centrist assumptions of philosophy as a discipline.  In this course we attempt to  expose the student/participant towards the proportionate and disproportionate relation philosophy shares with feminist thought. The course underlines the role philosophical thought plays in furthering the theory and praxis of feminist thought by delving into the different schools of feminism, different versions/languages of feminism and the disparate/contrasting narratives arising out of this complexity.

Disclaimer: The full course is divided into two parts. Part first is to be taught at MA III semester level and the Part second at MA IV semester level. Here we deal with Part I of the course.



PH-108 PLATO
MUZAFFAR ALI MALLA

PH-108 PLATO

The course is part of the "Reading a Philosopher" series of the Department in which the focus will be entirely  on different aspects of Plato's philosophical writings.   The course aims to:

1.  Situate and contextualize the relation between Plato and Socrates and understand the complexity that becomes pivotal for the history of Western Philosophy.

2. Introduce and initiate the (fresher) student to study primary readings/dialogues of Plato.

3. Introduce some basic issues and problems in Plato's epistemology, political philosophy & philosophy of language.

4. Study the dialogues such as  Meno, Theataus, Parmenides, Cratylus and Republic with reference to the concepts and issues mentioned in the syllabus.

PH-111 FACETS OF PHILOSOPHY
MUZAFFAR ALI MALLA

PH-111 FACETS OF PHILOSOPHY

The aim of this course is:

1. To help the student/participant understand the meaning, purpose and essence of philosophy through the conceptual prisms of various philosophers.

2. To acquaint the students with multiple layers of doing and studying philosophy through the medium of art, fiction, films and thought experiments.

3. To unravel the connections, differences, overlaps, intersections between various aspects of human undertaking especially philosophy, art, cinema and fiction.

4. To facilitate a lucid and interdisciplinary way of understanding and teaching philosophy so that students from other disciplines especially Aesthetics, Literature, Media Studies can participate in the teaching-learning process.